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Gene Brandi, Speaker at WAS Conference: Managing Honey Bees in California

A varroa mite (reddish-brownish spot at left beneath the wings) is attached to this forager nectaring on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Varroa mites--considered the No. 1 enemy of beekeepers--will be among the topics discussed when Gene Brandi of Los Banos, Calif., president of the American Beekeeping Federation, speaks at the 40th annual conference of the Western Apicultural Society, to...

Posted on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 at 4:54 PM

Getting Steak and Dessert at the Same Time

A European paper wasp catching prey on a showy milkweed, Asclepias speciosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch butterflies aren't the only insects that hang around milkweed, their host plant. You're likely to see a variety of predators, such as the European paper wasp, Polistes dominula. This paper wasp is a little skittish around paparazzi so it helps...

Posted on Monday, August 14, 2017 at 5:07 PM

Living with Wildlife at Hopland REC

In December 2016 we held our first workshop to share research and allow community conversation regarding ranching in an area rich in carnivores and the challenges that this poses. On August 31st we will be offering the follow up to this event, explaining current research efforts and the new data that has been collected on various methods of predator prevention.

We hope you can join us!

Living with Wildlife: New and Emerging Research

Date: August 31, 2017

Time: 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM (Registration from 8:30am)

Event Details

A series of brief research updates by UC ANR and other UC colleagues will detail ongoing work in the science and history of non-lethal carnivore control. Field demonstrations will allow direct experience of traditional and emerging non-lethal tools, including fencing types, guardian dogs, turbo fladry, Foxlights and e-Shepherd collars. Facilitated dialogue among diverse participants will be integrated throughout the day's presentations including a rancher panel with representatives from the beef and lamb sector and from the coast to further inland. We look forward to hosting a range of speakers and participants, understanding new findings, building new partnerships, and moving toward solutions to manage for livestock and natural resource conservation. 

This workshop promises to be of value to ranchers, agencies, non-profits, researchers and all those with an interest in tackling the challenges associated with ranching in a landscape rich in wildlife.

We hope you can join us at Hopland for this important and exciting event!

$25 per person, includes lunch.
No one turned away due to lack of funds - email hbird@ucanr.edu for more details

Contact: Hannah Bird (707) 744 1424 ext 105 hbird@ucanr.edu

Sponsor: Hopland Research and Extension Center/UC Berkeley

Location: Rod Shippey Hall, UC Hopland Research and Extension Center 4070 University Road, Hopland CA 95449

 

Click here to register

Posted on Monday, August 14, 2017 at 8:29 AM
Tags: control (1), coyotes (10), predator (12), ranching (4), sheep (15), wildlife (33)

'Bee Man' Norm Gary Featured at WAS Conference at UC Davis

'Bee Man' Norm Gary is surrounded by bees as he is about to perform a bee wrangling stunt. He is now retired from bee wrangling. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees intrigue, delight and fascinate Norman Gary. In fact, they have for 70 years. Seven decades. Yes, that's how long he's kept bees. Norm Gary's 70-year career includes both hobby and commercial beekeeping, but you probably know him by his...

Posted on Friday, August 11, 2017 at 4:38 PM

4-H and Google team up to teach youth computer science

California is one of 22 states in the nation where a new Google career education program was launched today. The Internet search giant has donated $1.5 million to the National 4‑H Council to build skills youth will need for the future, like computer science, computational thinking, communication and collaboration, reported Christopher Walljasper on AgWeb.

Google.org choose to partner with 4-H to provide education to the nation's youth.

The funding lays the foundation to launch the 4‑H Computer Science Career Pathway, which will reach more than 100,000 kids in its first year. 4-H members in Alabama, California, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia and West Virginia will have access to new devices, curriculum and training.

President of National 4-H Council Jennifer Sirangelo said the career pathway will translate abstract concepts to relatable, practical experiences the 4-H members can use to explore the field of computer science, beginning from interest to studying computer science to choosing computer science for a career.

"We're excited to partner with all the enthusiasm and energy of the Googlers," she said.

Charlotte Smith of Google.org noted that 4-H is the largest community based organization in America.

"We already have 22 states signed up. That's more than we dreamed of," Smith said.

Smith said Google wants kids to develop the skills they will need in the future.

"We don't know what the jobs of tomorrow will look like," Smith said. "Some of them might require computer science skills, but it's much more than that - problem solving, collaboration. We want to give kids as many kinds of tools as we can so they can succeed in any discipline and any field."

Posted on Friday, August 11, 2017 at 3:01 PM
Tags: 4-H (69), computers (1), google.org (1)

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