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Posts Tagged: Halloween

Those Iconic Monarchs: Treats on Halloween and Every Other Day

A newly eclosed monarch, ready to take flight. This image was taken on Sept. 24, 2018 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy  Keatley Garvey)

It's Halloween and scores of trick-or-treaters are donning monarch butterfly costumes.  But they can't do justice to the living monarchs, those iconic, majestic butterflies that are always dressed in Halloween colors: black and orange. It's always...

A newly eclosed monarch, ready to take flight. This image was taken on Sept. 24, 2018 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy  Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed monarch, ready to take flight. This image was taken on Sept. 24, 2018 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed monarch, ready to take flight. This image was taken on Sept. 24, 2018 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Spreading her wings on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia), the newly released Monarch is about to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Spreading her wings on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia), the newly released Monarch is about to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Spreading her wings on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia), the newly released Monarch is about to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 31, 2018 at 3:00 PM

A PiƱata That Only Entomologists Could Love

The Halloween party invitation from the Bohart Museum of Entomology featured an Acroceridae fly and larva. (Images the work of Nicole Tam, UC Davis alumnus)

Have you ever hit a piñata? Hit it and smashed it to smithereens?   It was probably a Fiesta-ish piñata--maybe a colorful unicorn, donkey, or pony, right?   Bet it wasn't a fly.   And bet it wasn't a fly from the genus...

The Halloween party invitation from the Bohart Museum of Entomology featured an Acroceridae fly and larva. (Images the work of Nicole Tam, UC Davis alumnus)
The Halloween party invitation from the Bohart Museum of Entomology featured an Acroceridae fly and larva. (Images the work of Nicole Tam, UC Davis alumnus)

The Halloween party invitation from the Bohart Museum of Entomology featured an Acroceridae fly and larva. (Images the work of Nicole Tam, UC Davis alumnus)

UC Davis PhD student Charlotte Herbert as
UC Davis PhD student Charlotte Herbert as"Maggie the Maggot," and her fiance, George Alberts, as "Farmer Maggot," or his interpreation of Farmer Maggot from "The Lord of Rings." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis PhD student Charlotte Herbert as"Maggie the Maggot," and her fiance, George Alberts, as "Farmer Maggot," or his interpreation of Farmer Maggot from "The Lord of Rings." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis PhD students Charlotte Herbert (left) and Jessica Gillung admire the fly pinata, depicting the genus Acrocera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis PhD students Charlotte Herbert (left) and Jessica Gillung admire the fly pinata, depicting the genus Acrocera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis PhD students Charlotte Herbert (left) and Jessica Gillung admire the fly pinata, depicting the genus Acrocera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis PhD student Charlotte Herbert takes a swing at the fly pinata that she and her fiance, George Alberts, created for the Bohart Museum of Entomology Halloween party. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis PhD student Charlotte Herbert takes a swing at the fly pinata that she and her fiance, George Alberts, created for the Bohart Museum of Entomology Halloween party. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis PhD student Charlotte Herbert takes a swing at the fly pinata that she and her fiance, George Alberts, created for the Bohart Museum of Entomology Halloween party. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis PhD student Jessica Gillung dressed as a raccoon at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's Halloween party. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis PhD student Jessica Gillung dressed as a raccoon at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's Halloween party. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis PhD student Jessica Gillung dressed as a raccoon at the Bohart Museum of Entomology's Halloween party. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 31, 2017 at 2:24 PM

Orange You Glad It's Almost Halloween?

Orange you glad it's almost Halloween? A juvenile bold jumping spider, Phidippus audax, hangs out on a showy milkweed.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You can't get any more Halloween than a bold (daring) jumping spider with orange spots! This common North American spider was hanging out yesterday on our showy milkweed, Asclepias speciosa, trying to look like a spectator instead of a predator....

Orange you glad it's almost Halloween? A juvenile bold jumping spider, Phidippus audax, hangs out on a showy milkweed.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Orange you glad it's almost Halloween? A juvenile bold jumping spider, Phidippus audax, hangs out on a showy milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Orange you glad it's almost Halloween? A juvenile bold jumping spider, Phidippus audax, hangs out on a showy milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A predator, a bold or daring jumping spider, crawls around on a showy milkweed. Note its iridescent chelicerae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A predator, a bold or daring jumping spider, crawls around on a showy milkweed. Note its iridescent chelicerae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A predator, a bold or daring jumping spider, crawls around on a showy milkweed. Note its iridescent chelicerae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

My safe place! The bold or daring jumping spider peers out at its surroundings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
My safe place! The bold or daring jumping spider peers out at its surroundings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

My safe place! The bold or daring jumping spider peers out at its surroundings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 23, 2017 at 4:50 PM

Sharing the Nectar--But Not All at the Same Time

A syrphid fly (bottom right) heads toward a Mexican sunflower occupied by a honey bee. The fly, aka hover fly and flower fly, wants some nectar, too.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Everybody eats in the pollinator garden. Maybe not at the same time, but they all eat. We noticed a syrphid fly, aka flower fly/hover fly, heading toward a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in our pollinator garden. Alas for the fly, it was occupied....

A syrphid fly (bottom right) heads toward a Mexican sunflower occupied by a honey bee. The fly, aka hover fly and flower fly, wants some nectar, too.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly (bottom right) heads toward a Mexican sunflower occupied by a honey bee. The fly, aka hover fly and flower fly, wants some nectar, too.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly (bottom right) heads toward a Mexican sunflower occupied by a honey bee. The fly, aka hover fly and flower fly, wants some nectar, too.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can we share? As the honey bee keeps nectaring, the syrphid comes in for a taste. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Can we share? As the honey bee keeps nectaring, the syrphid comes in for a taste. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can we share? As the honey bee keeps nectaring, the syrphid comes in for a taste. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! The honey bee wins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All mine! The honey bee wins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! The honey bee wins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! The syprhid fly takes over. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All mine! The syprhid fly takes over. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! The syprhid fly takes over. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! A drone fly claims it. The drone fly is often mistaken for a bee. Note the
All mine! A drone fly claims it. The drone fly is often mistaken for a bee. Note the "H" on the abdomen of the fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! A drone fly claims it. The drone fly is often mistaken for a bee. Note the "H" on the abdomen of the fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 13, 2016 at 4:36 PM
Tags: drone fly (13), Halloween (9), honey bee (196), insects (52), Mexican sunflower (41), nectar (7), syrphid fly (17), Tithonia (49)

The Arachnid Version of a Web Designer and Developer

An orb weaver spider with its prey, a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Orb-weaver spiders know a thing or two about web design and development. And their skills have nothing to do with computers. Have you ever stepped out into your garden in the early morning and seen a spiral or wheel-shaped web glistening with droplets...

An orb weaver spider with its prey, a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An orb weaver spider with its prey, a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An orb weaver spider with its prey, a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the spider and the bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of the spider and the bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the spider and the bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

After breakfast, the spider slides down a stem to find a shaded spot away from the blazing sun--and to rest for a bit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
After breakfast, the spider slides down a stem to find a shaded spot away from the blazing sun--and to rest for a bit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

After breakfast, the spider slides down a stem to find a shaded spot away from the blazing sun--and to rest for a bit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 5:07 PM

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