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Posts Tagged: leafcutter bee

The Most Incredible Image of a Leafcutter Bee

An amazing image of a leafcutter bee carrying a leaf segment back to her nest. This image, used with permission, is by Donna Sanders of Emerald, Queensland, Australia.

It's one of the most beautiful, incredible images of a leafcutter bee we've ever seen. Talented macro insect photographer Donna Sanders of Emerald, Queensland, Australia, captured this spectacular photo (below) of a female leafcutter bee carrying a leaf...

An amazing image of a leafcutter bee carrying a leaf segment back to her nest. This image, used with permission, is by Donna Sanders of Emerald, Queensland, Australia.
An amazing image of a leafcutter bee carrying a leaf segment back to her nest. This image, used with permission, is by Donna Sanders of Emerald, Queensland, Australia.

An amazing image of a leafcutter bee carrying a leaf segment back to her nest. This image, used with permission, is by Donna Sanders of Emerald, Queensland, Australia.

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., on rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, in Vacaville, Calif. The seventh annual International Pollinator Conference is set Wednesday, July 17 through Saturday, July 20 in the UC Davis Conference Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., on rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, in Vacaville, Calif. The seventh annual International Pollinator Conference is set Wednesday, July 17 through Saturday, July 20 in the UC Davis Conference Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., on rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, in Vacaville, Calif. The seventh annual International Pollinator Conference is set Wednesday, July 17 through Saturday, July 20 in the UC Davis Conference Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., peers over a rock purslane petal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., peers over a rock purslane petal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., peers over a rock purslane petal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, March 22, 2019 at 4:45 PM

International Exposure for Three UC Davis-Affiliated Photographers

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

Images by three UC Davis-affiliated photographers will be among those displayed at the international Insect Salon photography competition at the Entomological Society of America's meeting, Nov. 11-14 in Vancouver, B.C. The insect photographers:...

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)
This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)
This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)

This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)

This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a  honey bee covered with pollen from mustard.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a honey bee covered with pollen from mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a honey bee covered with pollen from mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sharing the Bounty with the Bees

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., in flight, heading toward the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Move over, monarchs. Bees--and other pollinators--gravitate toward the enticing aroma of the milkweed, too. The milkweed is widely known as the larval host plant of the monarch butterflies--and a nectar source for the adults--but they have to...

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., in flight, heading toward the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., in flight, heading toward the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., in flight, heading toward the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., sips nectar from a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., sips nectar from a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., sips nectar from a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, a green-eyed blond, sipping nectar from the milkweed.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, a green-eyed blond, sipping nectar from the milkweed.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, a green-eyed blond, sipping nectar from the milkweed.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, sipping nectar from the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, sipping nectar from the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, sipping nectar from the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee leaving with pollinia (pollen structure) from the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee leaving with pollinia (pollen structure) from the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee leaving with pollinia (pollen structure) from the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 at 5:25 PM

Bad Day for a Bee

A praying mantis snares a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was a good day to be a praying mantis. It was not a good day to be a honey bee. Just before noon today, we watched a green praying mantis lurking in the African blue basil, like a camouflaged soldier ready to ambush the enemy. His eyes remain focused...

A praying mantis snares a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis snares a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis snares a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The leafcutter bee targets the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The leafcutter bee targets the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The leafcutter bee targets the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The leafcutter bee nearly slams into the mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The leafcutter bee nearly slams into the mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The leafcutter bee nearly slams into the mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis keeps eating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis keeps eating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis keeps eating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis polishes off the last morsel. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis polishes off the last morsel. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis polishes off the last morsel. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, September 1, 2014 at 4:22 PM
Tags: honey bee (196), leafcutter bee (11), praying mantis (85)

Just bee-cause

It's National Pollinator Week. Have you hugged your pollinators today, particularly the bees?

If you don't pay attention to the bees around you, you may think that every floral visitor is a honey bee (Apis mellifera) or a bumble bee (Bombus).

Not!

If you look closely, you'll see bee diversity: leafcutter bees, green metallic sweat bees, cuckoo bees, long-horned bees, carpenter bees, and squash bees, just to name a few.

Native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, UC Davis emeritus professor of entomology, has detected 80 different species of bees - and counting - in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven on Bee Biology Road at UC Davis. The half-acre garden, planted in the fall of 2009, is located next to the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. It's intended to be a year-around food source for the Laidlaw bees and other pollinators, to raise public awareness about the plight of bees, and to demonstrate what you can plant in your own garden.

"Of about 4,000 bee species known in the entire United States, about 1,600 have been recorded in California," according to Gordon Frankie of UC Berkeley, Robbin Thorp and their colleagues, in a must-read article in California Agriculture.

They point out: "...many types of urban residential gardens provide floral and nesting resources for the reproduction and survival of bees, especially a diversity of native bees. Habitat gardening for bees, using targeted ornamental plants, can predictably increase bee diversity and abundance, and provide clear pollination benefits."

Be sure to check out UC Berkeley's Urban Bee Gardens website that's described as "a practical guide to introducing the world’s most prolific pollinators into your garden." It's an educational treasure.

Bottom line: It's good to bee-aware, especially when research studies show that our pollinator population is declining worldwide.

A male cuckoo bee, Triepeolus concavus, the cuckoo that is a cleptoparasite on Svastra, according to Robbin Thorp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male cuckoo bee, Triepeolus concavus, the cuckoo that is a cleptoparasite on Svastra, according to Robbin Thorp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male cuckoo bee, Triepeolus concavus, the cuckoo that is a cleptoparasite on Svastra, according to Robbin Thorp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutting bee, Megachile sp., on rock purslane.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male leafcutting bee, Megachile sp., on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutting bee, Megachile sp., on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey

A male long-horned bee, Melissodes communis, on salvia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male long-horned bee, Melissodes communis, on salvia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male long-horned bee, Melissodes communis, on salvia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee,  Xylocopa varipuncta. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Male squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, June 19, 2013 at 7:13 AM

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